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A Quarter Century of Trying Hard | Whistler Wonderland.

MTB Wideopen Magazine

Scottish enduro pinner Michael Clyne is aiming to take the 2019 Enduro World Series Masters championship off his own back.Crankworx Whistler and the Canadian Open Enduro would push riders’ abilities to hold on as the mostly lift-assisted race would
'Scottish enduro pinner Michael Clyne is aiming to take the 2019 Enduro World Series Masters championship off his own back.Crankworx Whistler and the Canadian Open Enduro would push riders’ abilities to hold on as the mostly lift-assisted race would focus very much on the descending portion of enduro.Racing a full Enduro World Series as a privateer is mostly unheard of, let alone going for the biggest scalp of them all, the championship overall.That is exactly what Michael Clyne aims to do, and he’s going to be checking in to let us know how he’s getting on throughout the year.Whistler, what a place.If you are a mountain biker then you must try to get here once in your life.The level of trail building here is on another planet.My accommodation was arranged via a mate of mate of a mate.And had me acting as the guard dog, sleeping in a garage.It’s awesome.Day 1 was spent building my bike up, going swimming in a lake off a raft pontoon and stretching my legs on a local trail off Blackcomb mountain.Day 2 was spent fixing several issues with the bike caused by the flight over I think and then a wee spin on the Lost Lake XC routes.Day 3 was spent climbing 4500 feet in one go to ride the spectacular “Lord of the Squirrels” trail, swimming in a glacial lake at 6000 feet and being eaten by mosquitos.Day 4 ( practice day 1). The trails were so long that it became silly to session stuff as there wasn’t time in the day or enough space in my head to store the information.Day 5 (practice day 2) was a real struggle for me as my hands were starting to blister from the 20,000ft of descending in 5 days.Day 6 (race day 1) only one stage.Top of the World, 5000ft, 24mins at race pace.I started off relaxed to save my arms, but being seeded 3rd meant I had the 2 pro riders, Cedric Ravanel and Karim Amour chasing me down.I fully expected to be overtaken by both, but was utterly gobsmacked how early on the trail it happened, so I upped my pace to try keep up with Cedric, which in hindsight wasn’t clever, as at the 12 minute mark my arms started to seize up, by the 19min mark I was done.I was forced to crawl the last part from the “Angry Pirate” trail to the bottom at a beginners’ pace.Finishing a disappointing 17th place.Day 7 (race day 2) it rained all night which I felt was a blessing as there would be more than a few riders struggling in the mud and grease.Stage 2 was steep and technical natural 6 minute trail.I held off Cedric Ravanel until a minute from the bottom, coming home in 10th.Stage 3 was a loose and rocky with some brutal punchy climbs.I held off Cedric again until the last minute.Things improving with a 9th on that stage.Stage 4 was back in the bike park with some natural trails in the mix.Us masters riders used our brains and found an open door in a nearby ski clubhouse and waited out the 30 minute gap in the warmth, microwaving our gloves to dry them off.Somebody also managed to set fire to their gloves.The 10 foot visibility  on this stage made speed judgement and route finding an adrenaline-fuelled affair.I got overtaken again by Cedric about midway, and trying to keep up with him only resulted in a puncture.My MSC tyre insert let me carry on and finished with a 12th.On Stage 5, I had to rush to put a tube in the tyre and pedal 1200ft to the top to make my start time.I did with 3 mins to spare.This stage was my best stage.It was a 100% natural, mud-infested mess of a trail.Like home from home.It was the only trail I never got caught by Cedric on.I dare say if I wasn’t knackered from my efforts to get there in time, and not stopped mid trail to switch my suspension back on.I would have been 4th or possibly even 2nd/3rd on this stage.A proud 6th was my placing though.Stage 6 was the final dance into the Whistler finish arena back on the bike park trails that I seem to suck so bad at.I got caught again by Cedric about midway, and again tried to stick with him.And again I punctured with 5 minutes of the stage left.However with only a tube in and no protective insert things became ludicrous as I basically couldn’t maintain any traction on the completely flat tyre.I kept riding though and careened across the finish line on my bare Sixth Element carbon rim, tyre and tube ripped off and flailing about behind me, much to the delight of the crowds. 22nd for the stage and 14th overall.Looking back, it was my worst ever race this season.Even if there were no disasters, I was truly outgunned in the “balls of steel” game on the bike park tracks.However, it’s been the best race yet for other reasons, I met so many cool people on track, so many stories, so many scares.I’ve never laughed so much on a race weekend.Truly awesome times were had.Something I’ve noticed though is the stages are now becoming more like full on DH tracks and away from what I would call enduro tracks.With cardio fitness becoming less relevant.The next round in Northstar has 6 stages… only one of which we will cycle up to and its a short climb too.Is this “enduro” or “multi track DH” racing?Not sure, but its a hell of a fun.I head into the next round still in 4th place overall.Stay tuned folks.Keep an eye out for Part 8 of A Quarter Century of Trying Hard coming after the Northstar, Californian round of the 2019 Enduro World Series.Missed Part One?Read it  here . Follow Mike Clyne’s Enduro World Series antics on his Instagram page  here . . The post A Quarter Century of Trying Hard | Whistler Wonderland. appeared first on Wideopen Magazine .'

IXS Launch the Trigger FF, The Lightest Full Face Out There.

MTB Wideopen Magazine

Swiss clothing and protection brand IXS have killed it with their new Trigger FF downhill-rated full face that comes in at just 600g.Could IXS have just launched the full face helmet to beat?The 600g and downhill-rated Trigger FF certainly looks the
'Swiss clothing and protection brand IXS have killed it with their new Trigger FF downhill-rated full face that comes in at just 600g.Could IXS have just launched the full face helmet to beat?The 600g and downhill-rated Trigger FF certainly looks the business.Designed to combine the coolness of an open face helmet with the protection of a full face, the Trigger FF is barely heavier than some of the weightier open face helmets on the market.Photos by Ale di Lullo.Key features: EN1078/ASTM/CPSC certified 600g (S/M size) Vortex ventilation (5 intake, 17 exhaust vents) VentMesh padding XFrame internal crash cage Goggle gripper Adjustable visor £199.99 RRP IXS.com IXS launched their all-new Trigger FF full face helmet today and it might just have reset the bar for how light a full face helmet can be.By recommended head size, it is the lightest on the market.At 600g for the S/M size it’s a featherweight and almost in heavy open face helmet territory.Weights do rise as the sizes go up, but most full face helmets will, unless the shell size remains the same and the padding is thinner as a result.Not an ideal situation… In any case, despite it’s low weight, the Trigger has not skimped on the technology.You get a full in-mold EPS liner with integrated XFrame crash cage for increased frontal impact protection.With the ErgoFit ratchet and FidLock strap, you should be able to fine tune the broad size range to suit your loaf.Ventilation is handled by IXS’ Vortex system which has five large intakes combined with seventeen exhaust ports to try and match an open face helmet for ventilation.VentMesh padding has been spread evenly over the inner to provide a uniform fit and ease any soreness on the head.Cheek pads are also removeable to fine tune the fit.The visor is also adjustable and combines with a goggle gripper to keep everything in place.Keep an eye out for a test on the Trigger FF on Wideopenmag soon.Full details on the IXS Trigger FF can be found on IXS’ website here . . The post IXS Launch the Trigger FF, The Lightest Full Face Out There. appeared first on Wideopen Magazine .'

Cam Zink Slams Hard on a 110 Foot Backflip Attempt.

MTB Wideopen Magazine

Cam Zink can count himself lucky to only have separated his AC joint in this fairly hefty crash building up to a 150ft backflip.What do you do when you over-rotate an 85ft gap, landing well beyond 100ft?Hold onto the bars and ride it out if you’re
'Cam Zink can count himself lucky to only have separated his AC joint in this fairly hefty crash building up to a 150ft backflip.What do you do when you over-rotate an 85ft gap, landing well beyond 100ft?Hold onto the bars and ride it out if you’re Cam Zink.You’d still be hoovering us off the hill if that had been us, but Cam just needs a wee rub on the back and up he jumps.Nails. . The post Cam Zink Slams Hard on a 110 Foot Backflip Attempt. appeared first on Wideopen Magazine .'

Wise Words | Caroline Buchanan.

MTB Wideopen Magazine

Wise Words is our new interview series talking to some of mountain biking’s most switched on people.We’ll ask our short list of questions to a heap of influential, inspiring and outspoken people that we feel are driving the direction of mountain
'Wise Words is our new interview series talking to some of mountain biking’s most switched on people.We’ll ask our short list of questions to a heap of influential, inspiring and outspoken people that we feel are driving the direction of mountain biking today.Some will make you think, some will make you laugh, some will be plain dumb, some will inspire you to better yourself and your riding.We hope!Wise Words this week come from Aussie double Olympian, Caroline Buchanan.Caroline Buchanan is an eight times World Champion across MTB and BMX, as well as being a double Olympian.Needless to say, she’s pretty handy on two wheels and definitely has a race head on her shoulders.She’s also a children’s author and is supporting the next generation of female cycling stars.Photo by Bill Perches.How would your closest riding buddies describe you to someone who has never met you?Determined, strong, all round rider and lover of everything 2 wheels, passionate about girls the sport and riding.What thing or things have you bought in the last year that had the biggest effect on your life as a mountain biker / cyclist / person that works in the bike industry?I bought a Garmin that’s helping me track my expenditure, and working with a nutritionist to monitor my fuel to balance my training load and recovery.What unusual habits do you have as a bike rider?I like to cross between many different wheel sizes and disciplines of riding and racing.Like BMX racing, mountain bike racing, freestyle BMX, dirt jumping mountain biking and road cycling.Photo by Bill Perches.What piece of advice do you think every mountain bike rider should hear?And what piece should they ignore?Stare at the tree. hit the tree.Stare at the rut and where you want to go, you will go where you want to go.Riding and life go hand in hand.Let go of what’s not important and off track and focus on your goals and plans to your path ahead If you could go back and re-ride one day from your life so far, where/what/when/who would it be?Would you change anything?If I could go back to the Rio Olympic Games I would have tightened my bars properly on my bike, I would have relaxed more in the semi final and not pedalled into the transition at the bottom of the hill causing me to front wheel case the first jump, my bars move and crash in the semi and not make it to the Olympic Games final.What have you wasted the most time on in your life as a rider or bike industry career that you wished you’d given up years ago?Trying to fit the mould of the bike industry and what they want.I wasted time trying to fit in versus standing out.When I focused on building my brand and projects, passions and corporate sponsor support out of Industry that’s when my true self and performer started shining and my income went up and greater opportunities arose.How do you motivate yourself when you’re struggling or lacking inspiration?By saying this shall pass if it’s something challenging.And by trying to not set the world on fire every day and simply be better than the day before in all aspects of life.What single and specific thing about riding bicycles do you gain the most happiness from?The freedom, the challenge and the people.That’s a hard one to split.Photo by Bill Perches.What single thing would you like to erase from cycling history from the last year?That’s a hard one personally what’s happened has defined me and shaped myself and industry.What single thing would you like to make happen in the cycling world in the next year?Women’s mountain bike slope style/freestyle events expand and have a solid platform for growth for the women in that space.Who else should we ask these questions to?Sally Fitzgibbons.You can follow Caroline on her Instagram feed here . You can catch all our previous Wise Words interviews with the likes of Sven Martin, Manon Carpenter, Ric McLaughlin and plenty more  here . . The post Wise Words | Caroline Buchanan. appeared first on Wideopen Magazine .'

2019 Enduro World Series | Round 6 | Crankworx Whistler Highlights.

MTB Wideopen Magazine

The Camelbak Canadian Open Enduro had no shortage of carnage as the rain rolled in, making the technical stages even more so.
'The Camelbak Canadian Open Enduro had no shortage of carnage as the rain rolled in, making the technical stages even more so.Two riders rose to the challenge despite some serious competition, taking the Queen Stage when it mattered but not having the luxury of clean sweeps like earlier in the year at the Crankworx Whistler round of the Enduro World Series.Watch the full highlights below. . The post 2019 Enduro World Series | Round 6 | Crankworx Whistler Highlights. appeared first on Wideopen Magazine .'

2020 Specialized Enduro | Everything You Need to Know.

MTB Wideopen Magazine

The Specialized Enduro had, for many years, been the long travel bike to beat, and with some substantial tweaks, can it retain that crown?The 2020 Specialized Enduro gets a major overhaul both in terms of suspension layout, travel and angles.
'The Specialized Enduro had, for many years, been the long travel bike to beat, and with some substantial tweaks, can it retain that crown?The 2020 Specialized Enduro gets a major overhaul both in terms of suspension layout, travel and angles.Four complete bikes and the S-Works frame will be available in the UK from late summer.The base model Comp Carbon starts at £4499.99, rising to the all-singing, all-dancing S-Works at a mighty £8,999.99.The S-Works frameset will set you back £3,299.99.You might have noticed the Demo downhill-bike inspired upper link that makes the Enduro look less like an up-scaled Stumpjumper, and that linkage offers 170mm of travel, as well as having more anti-squat dialled into it for this model.Angles are impressive and Specialized have broken the mould of generally going quite conservative in this department.Considering the Enduro is only available as a 29er, the standard 64.3 degree head angle is slacker than some downhill bikes.With the flip chip though, you can squeeze that to 63.9 degrees.Reach on the medium is a healthy 464mm with a 420mm seat tube at 76 degrees.Full details on the 2020 Specialized Enduro range can be found on their website here . See what Pete made of the out-going version of the Specialized Enduro in his review here . . The post 2020 Specialized Enduro | Everything You Need to Know. appeared first on Wideopen Magazine .'